An Abridgment of Lectures on Rhetorick

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J. T. Buckingham, 1805 - 264 pages
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Page 23 - Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 19 - He made darkness His secret place: His pavilion round about Him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies.
Page 20 - Thus saith the LORD, thy redeemer, and he that formed thee from the womb, I am the LORD that maketh all things ; that stretcheth forth the heavens alone ; that spreadeth abroad the earth by myself...
Page 96 - I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flowers That never will in other climate grow...
Page 77 - But God be thanked, his pride is greater than his ignorance, and what he wants in knowledge he supplies by sufficiency. When he has looked about him, as far as he can, he concludes there is no more to be seen ; when he is at the end of his line he is at the bottom of the ocean ; when he has shot his best, he is sure none ever did, nor ever can, shoot better, or beyond it.
Page 86 - When the whole is put for a part, or a part for the whole ; a genus for a species, or a species for a genus; the...
Page 206 - I have seen the walls of Balclutha, but they were desolate. The fire had resounded in the halls : and the voice of the people is heard no more. The stream of Clutha was removed from its place by the fall of the walls. The thistle shook there its lonely head ; the moss whistled to the wind. The fox looked out from the windows, the rank grass of the wall waved round its head. Desolate is the dwelling of Moina, silence is in the house of her fathers.
Page 21 - Above, the sire of gods his thunder rolls, And peals on peals redoubled rend the poles. Beneath...
Page 14 - Hence the grandeur of earthquakes and burning mountains ; of great conflagrations ; of the stormy ocean and overflowing waters ; of tempests of wind ; of thunder and lightning; and of all the uncommon violence of the elements: nothing is more sublime than mighty power and strength.
Page 20 - That saith of Cyrus, He is my shepherd, and shall perform all my pleasure: even saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built; and to the temple, Thy foundation shall be laid.

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