The Repository, Or, Treasury of Politics and Literature for ...: Being a Complete Collection of the Best Letters (including Those of Junius) and Essays from the Daily Papers, Volume 1

Couverture
J. Murray, 1771
0 Avis
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 72 - Let us suppose a gracious well-intentioned prince made sensible at last of the great duty he owes to his people and of his own disgraceful situation...
Page 337 - I have ever made the law of the land the rule of my conduct, esteeming it my chief glory to reign over a free people. With this view I have always been careful, as well to execute faithfully the trust reposed in me, as to avoid even the appearance of invading any of those powers which the constitution has placed in other hands.
Page 242 - They attempted, but in vain, to convey the carcase from him ; he watched it perpetually, and would suffer nothing to touch it. The keeper then endeavoured to tempt him with variety of victuals, but he turned from all that was offered with loathing. They then put several living dogs into his cage, and these he instantly tore piecemeal, but left their members on the floor.
Page 242 - ... to sleep within the fangs and under the jaws of his terrible patron. A gentleman who had lost the spaniel, and had advertised a reward of two guineas to the finder, at length heard of the adventure, and went to reclaim his dog. You see, sir...
Page 72 - ... to his king and country, and that the great person whom he addresses has spirit enough to bid him speak freely, and understanding enough to listen to him with attention.
Page 351 - KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. The humble Address, Remonstrance, and Petition, of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Livery of the city of London, in Common Hall assembled.
Page 72 - King and country, and that the great person whom he addresses has spirit enough to bid him speak freely, and understanding enough to listen to him with attention. Unacquainted with the vain impertinence of forms, he would deliver his sentiments with dignity and firmness, but not without respect.
Page 338 - Wales, and intrusted with the most important secrets of government, must tend to alarm and disgust the friends of the present Royal Family, and to encourage the hopes and attempts of the Jacobites...
Page 97 - House of Commons is not original, but delegated to them for the welfare of the people from whom they received it.
Page 137 - The detachment from the foot guards, relieved every twenty-four hours, which has for some time past done duty in Spitalfields, at the requisition of the worthy magistrates acting there, in order to secure the public peace, went by order from hence ; but no particular directions were given as to the manner in which they should march, which was left, as usual, to the discretion of the commanding officer.

Informations bibliographiques