Practical Philosophy of Social Life: Or, The Art of Conversing with Men: After the German of Baron Knigge

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Penniman & Bliss, O. Penniman, printers, Troy, 1805 - 368 pages
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Page 101 - Thou shalt rise up before the hoary head, and honour the face of the old man, and fear thy God : I am the LORD.
Page 308 - ... a man in such a complicated train of crimes and vices, and ruin whole families so completely, as the baneful rage for gambling. It produces and nourishes all imaginable disgraceful sensations ; it is the most fertile nursery of covetousness, envy, rage, malice, dissimulation, falsehood, and foolish reliance on blind fortune ; it frequently leads to fraud, quarrels, murder, forgery, meanness, and despair ; and robs us in the most unpardonable manner of the greatest and most irrecoverable treasure...
Page 100 - ... nature has impressed on the soul are reasoned away in our enlightened age, which is so carefully cleared of all the rubbish of antiquated prejudices. One of these prejudices is the sense of regard for hoary age. Our youth ripen sooner, grow sooner wise and learned than those of former times did. They repair by diligent reading, particularly of magazines, pamphlets and novels their want of experience and study. This renders them so intelligent as to be able to decide upon subjects which our forefathers...
Page 83 - J advife you particularly to notice the innocent hobby horfes of the Great with whom you wifh to ingratiate yourfelf; for a lafh given to this favourite ' is more painfully felt,* as Triftram Shandy obferves, * than a blow which the rider receives.' § XXVI. It is eafy and pleafant to converfe with cheerful and lively people who are animated with real good humour ; I fay they muft be animated with real good humour ; their cheerfulnefs muft flow from the heart, muft not confift in idle jefting, nor...
Page 169 - He returned no anfwer, but gave him on his fetting out for Potfdam, a little bag of peafe which he was to deliver to the king without a letter. Frederick was fenfible that his friend would not have given fuch a commiffion to a man of the common clafs, and received the bearer into his fervice. More delicate and refined fouls generally have a peculiarly fecret language which is underftood only by themfelves. Yet there are inftances in which we need not to hefitate applying to our friends ; namely,...
Page 102 - It is a sacred duty to give them no offence whatever, to abstain in their company from all wanton discourses and actions, and to display in their presence benevolence, faith, sincerity, decency and every other virtue ; in short, to con.tribute as much as possible to their improvement; for their ductile and uncorrupted mind is as ready to receive...
Page 107 - ... necessary to observe, that if children really should have reason to be ashamed of the weakness or the vices of their parents, they will do much better to conceal their defects, as much as possible, than to neglect paying them that external regard which they owe them in many respects. The blessings of Heaven, and the approbation of all good men, are the certain rewards of the attention which sons and daughters pay to the comfort and happiness of their parents.
Page 129 - Strengthen and fteel your heart by the aid of philofophy, by confidence in GOD, hope and wife refolution, and then appear before your confort with a ferene countenence, to pour the balfam of comfort in her foul. No mifery in this world is* endlefs, and no pain fo great as not to admit of intervals of alleviation. A certain heroifm in...
Page 309 - ... and despair ; and robs us in the most unpardonable manner of the greatest and most irrecoverable treasure — time. Those that are rich act foolishly in venturing their money in uncertain speculations ; and those that have not much to risk must play with timidity, and cannot long continue play unless the fortune of the game turn, as being obliged to quit the field at the first heavy blow ; or if they stake...
Page 107 - Children forget but too often how many cheerful hours they have imbittered to their parents by their...

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