The British encyclopedia, or, Dictionary of arts and sciences, Volume 4

Couverture
1809
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Page 16 - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws, by regal authority, as it hath been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal.
Page 17 - THE third absolute right, inherent in every Englishman, is that of property : which consists in the free use, enjoyment, and disposal of all his acquisitions, without any control or diminution, save only by the laws of the land.
Page 15 - But every man, when he enters into society, gives up a part of his natural liberty, as the price of so valuable a purchase ; and in consideration of receiving the advantages of mutual commerce, obliges himself to conform to those laws, which the community has thought proper to establish.
Page 16 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening, and preserving of the laws, parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Page 17 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Page 7 - THIS is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made he him; male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam; in the day when they were created.
Page 13 - ... such indictment or information; and shall not be required or directed, by the court or judge before whom such indictment or information...
Page 15 - Political, therefore, or civil liberty, which is that of a member of society, is no other than natural liberty so far restrained by human laws (and no farther) as is necessary and expedient for the general advantage of the public.
Page 9 - The memory of some men, it is true, is very tenacious, even to a miracle; but yet there seems to be a constant decay of all our ideas, even of those which are struck deepest...
Page 13 - For the same reason, it is immaterial, with respect to the essence of a libel, whether the matter of it be true or false; since the provocation, and not the falsity, is the thing to be punished criminally; though, doubtless, the falsehood of it may aggravate its guilt and enhance its punishment.

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