The Harleian Miscellany: Or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as Well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford's Library, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes, Volume 4

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R. Dutton, 1809
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Page 237 - For the Lord God will help me; therefore shall I not be confounded: therefore have I set my face like a flint, and I know that I shall not be ashamed.
Page 288 - He causeth the vapours to ascend from the ends of the earth ; he maketh lightnings for the rain ; he bringeth the wind out of his treasuries.
Page 554 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 203 - ... having of May games, Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used: so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service...
Page 350 - And the House of Representatives, by protestation, saving to themselves the liberty of exhibiting at any time hereafter any further articles or other accusation...
Page 465 - Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and the Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by authority of the same...
Page 296 - From lightning and tempest; from plague, pestilence, and famine ; from battle and murder, and from sudden death, Good Lord, deliver us.
Page 178 - Lastly, let us remember, in how many instances we have all left undone those things which we ought to have done, and done those things which we ought not to have done.
Page 520 - Court, commanding them neither to spare for any cost, expense, or travayle, to make such a triumphant banquet as they might not only wonder at it here, but also make a glorious report of it in their country, to the great honour of the king and his realm.
Page 233 - I gave my back to the smiters, and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair : I hid not my face from shame and spitting.

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