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PLAIN COMMENTARY

ON

THE FOUR HOLY GOSPELS.

Intended Chiefly for Debotional Reading.

ASK FOR THE OLD PATHS, WHERE IS THE GOOD WAY, AND WALK THEREIN; AND YE SHALL FIND
REST FOR YOUR SOULS.-JEREMIAH vi. 16.

GRANT, O LORD, THAT IN READING THY WORD, I MAY NEVER PREFER MY OWN SENTIMENTS BEFORE
THOSE OF THE CHURCH IN THE PURELY ANCIENT TIMES OF CHRISTIANITY.-Bp. WILSON.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

ST. LUKE.-ST. JOHN.

SECOND AMERICAN EDITION, COMPLETE FROM THE LONDON EDITION.

PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY HERMAN HOOKER,

S.W. CORNER CHESTNUT AND EIGHTH STREETS.

1860.

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1 The Preface of Luke to his whole Gospel. 5 The Conception of John the Bap tist, 26 and of CHRIST. 39 The prophecy of Elizabeth, and of Mary, concerning CHRIST. 57 The nativity and circumcision of John. 67 The prophecy of Zacharias, both of CHRIST, 76 and of John.

ST. LUKE, who wrote his Gospel after those of St. Matthew and St. Mark had been published, will be found to supply many particulars of our LORD's life which the two earlier Evangelists omit. He was divinely guided to begin his Narrative from a much earlier period than they; and to "set forth in order" the history of the Birth, not only of our Blessed SAVIOUR, but of His Forerunner likewise. It has been piously, and reasonably thought, that he derived some of his information as to these events, (subject to the suggestions and guidance of the HOLY GHOST,) from the Virgin Mother herself. In the course of this portion of his Gospel, occur the three Inspired Hymns which make part of our Daily Service.

St. Luke then proceeds to relate the same events, generally, as are found in St. Matthew and St. Mark; but always with important differences, in matters of detail. Five consecutive chapters, however, (ch. xiii. to ch. xvii.,) contain information peculiar to the present Gospel.

Though not actually one of the Apostolic body, he seems to have been an eyewitness of many of the events which he describes. (See below, the note on verse 3.) And there are places in his Gospel where he has been permitted to come wonderfully near his LORD; as when he describes the mysterious hour of His Agony in the Garden:-xxii. 41 to 46.

He begins his Narrative with relating something about himself; his qualification for the work of an Evangelist, and the purpose with which he wrote his Gospel:where every word is full of wonder, and even of difficulty. The Reader will also, (it is trusted,) find that every statement may be turned to edification and delight, as well. St. Paul relates(a) that St. Luke was a Physician of the Body. "The Brother, whose praise is in the Gospel throughout all the Churches," (b) is found to have been also a skillful Physician of the Soul.

1, 2 FORASMUCH as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

(a) Colossians iv. 14.

(b) 2 Cor. viii. 18.

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