Voluntaryism in England and Wales; or, The census of 1851

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Society for the Liberation of Religion from State-Patronage and Control, 1854 - 113 pages
 

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Page 1 - By nature free, not overruled by fate Inextricable, or strict necessity: Our voluntary service he requires, Not our necessitated; such with him Finds no acceptance, nor can find ; for how Can hearts, not free, be tried whether they serve Willing or no, who will but what the'y must By destiny, and can no other choose?
Page 68 - Lord was building, some cutting, some squaring the marble, others hewing the cedars, there should be a sort of irrational men, who could not consider there must be many schisms and many dissections made in the quarry and in the timber, ere the house of God can be built. And when every stone is laid artfully together, it cannot be united into a continuity, it can but be contiguous in this world : neither can every piece of the building be of one form ; nay rather the perfection consists in this, that...
Page 55 - Latterly, a sentiment appears to have been strongly prevalent, that the relief of spiritual destitution must not be exclusively devolved upon the State...
Page 16 - Registrar-General, and whether, in consequence, any doubt existed as to their fairness ; also, whether there was any reason for suspecting that the Dissenting Returns had been exaggerated, so that the number of attendants at the Established Church on the Census Sunday had been made to appear comparatively below the truth ? "
Page 68 - Yet these are the men cried out against for schismatics and sectaries, as if, while the temple of the Lord was building, some cutting, some squaring the marble, others hewing the cedars, there should be a sort of irrational men, who could not consider there must be many schisms and many dissections made in the quarry and in the timber ere the house of God can be built. And when every stone is laid artfully together, it cannot be united...
Page 9 - The extent to which returns, in answer to this application, were received, affords abundant evidence of the hearty co-operation of the clergy and the ministers of all denominations in this voluntary labour. Such returns have .been obtained from 14,077 churches belonging to the Church of England, and from 20,390 places of worship belonging to all other religious bodies. From this simple fact alone it will be manifest that these returns are nearly as complete as could be wished for...
Page 8 - LISTER. A CENSUS OF RELIGIONS. * WHETHER we regard a people merely in their secular capacity, as partners in a great association for promoting the stability, the opulence, the peaceful glory of a state ; or view them in their loftier character as subjects of a higher kingdom — swift and momentary travellers towards a never-ending destiny ; in either aspect the degree and the direction of religious sentiment in a community are subjects of the weightiest import — in the one case to the temporal...
Page 68 - Protestant community ; and, though the different organization of these several bodies seems to present, externally, an aspect of disunion, probably a closer scrutiny will show that they are separated only as to matters whose importance, even if considerable, is not vital ; and that thus they may, without excess of charity, be recognised as truly, though invisibly, united to the general church of Christ. Perhaps in a people like the English, trained to the exercise of private judgment, and inured...
Page 8 - for many reasons, the religion of a nation must be matter of extreme solicitude to many minds. Whether we regard a people merely in their secular capacity as partners in a great association for promoting the stability, the opulence, the peaceful glory of a state, or view them in their loftier character as subjects of a higher kingdom — swift and momentary travellers towards a never-ending destiny — in either aspect the degree and the direction of religious sentiment in a community are subjects...
Page 68 - ... ere the house of God can be built : and when every stone is laid artfully together, it cannot be united into a continuity, it can but be contiguous in this world ; neither can every piece of the building be of one form...

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