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Bound in neat Cloth, at 2s. 6d. each.

Sold by THOMAS WARD and Co., 27, Paternoster Row.

CHRISTIAN EXPERIENCE;

OR,

A GUIDE TO THE PERPLEXED.

"I should know how to speak a word in season, to him that is weary."-ISAIAH.

COMMUNION WITH GOD;

OR,

A GUIDE TO THE DEVOTIONAL.

"He that cometh to God must believe that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.”—PAUL.

PLEASING GOD;

OR,

A GUIDE TO THE CONSCIENTIOUS.

THE GOD OF GLORY;

OR,

A GUIDE TO THE DOUBTING.

New Series; for the Young,

MANLY PIETY IN ITS PRINCIPLES.

MANLY PIETY IN ITS SPIRIT.

No. I.

THE DUTY OF REALIZING ETERNITY.

DID "ETERNAL LIFE" suggest to us only the bare idea of living for ever in an unknown world, it would deserve more attention than is usually given to heaven or hell. "The life that now is," is such an evanescent vapour, that "everlasting life," however deeply veiled as to its place or employments, is a contrast which ought to arrest and rivet supreme attention. The bare fact of immortality is fraught with instruction and warning. It has a commanding character, independent of its revealed character. For, as life involves thought, and feeling, and action; an eternity of thinking, an eternity of feeling, an eternity of acting, is a solemn consideration! It could not be weighed without profit. Who would not be

improved, both in character and spirit, by arguing thus:-"I "I must think for ever: would an eternal train of my usual thoughts be either worthy of me, or useful to me? I must feel for ever: would an eternal reign of my present spirit and desires please me? must act for ever: would an eternal course of my habitual conduct bring happiness, or even bear reflection ?"

I

We could not bring our tastes and tempers to this test, without improving both. The moment we realize an Eternity of any vice or folly we are shocked. To be eternally passionate, or eternally sensual, or eternally covetous, or eternally capricious, is a state of being which must be appalling and repulsive even to the victims of these vices. Thus, independent of all the light shed upon immortality by the gospel, immortality itself sheds strong and steady lights upon our personal interests and relative duties. Life involves, also, society, intercourse, and their natural results. Would

then an eternity of the terms and temper of our present domestic and social life be altogether agrecable to us? Should we like to

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