The Christian Remembrancer, Volume 6

Couverture
F.C. & J. Rivington, 1843
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Page 306 - Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine.
Page 311 - Round their golden houses, girdled with the gleaming world : Where they smile in secret, looking over wasted lands, Blight and famine, plague and earthquake, roaring deeps and fiery sands, Clanging fights, and flaming towns, and sinking ships, and praying hands. But they smile, they find a music centred in a doleful song Steaming up, a lamentation and an ancient tale of wrong, Like a tale of little meaning tho...
Page 251 - Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss Though winning near the goal — yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
Page 311 - I sleep so sound all night, mother, that I shall never wake, If you do not call me loud when the day begins to break : But I must gather knots of flowers, and buds and garlands gay, For I'm to be Queen o' the May, mother, I'm to be Queen o
Page 300 - I LOVE it, I love it ; and who shall dare To chide me for loving that old arm-chair ? I've treasured it long as a sainted prize, I've bedewed it with tears, and embalmed it with sighs ; Tis bound by a thousand bands to my heart : Not a tie will break, not a link will start Would ye learn the spell ? a mother sat there, And a sacred thing is that old arm-chair.
Page 252 - Homer ruled as his demesne : Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: — Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken ; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific — and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmise — Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Page 336 - There the wicked cease from troubling; and there the weary be at rest. There the prisoners rest together; they hear not the voice of the oppressor. The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master.
Page 679 - HOW firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord, Is laid for your faith in his excellent word ! What more can he say than to you he hath said, You who unto Jesus for refuge have fled...
Page 120 - Though they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving Why they do it : And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it. Who made the heart, 'tis He alone Decidedly can try us ; He knows each chord its various tone, Each spring, its various bias: Then at the balance let 's be mute, We never can adjust it ; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted.
Page 336 - And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch? 40 The disciple is not above his master : but every one that is perfect shall be as his master.

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