The benefits and advantages gain'd by the late septennial parliament, set in a clear light, by a member

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1722
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Page 5 - ... our royal will and pleafure to call a new parliament : and do hereby further declare that, with the advice of our privy council we have, this day, given order to our chancellor of Great Britain to...
Page 23 - Right, as to him feems belt, and moft for the Good and Benefit of his People, without Application to Parliament, either to approve or confirm. But admitting that of late Years Parliaments have thought themfelves...
Page 17 - Members are chosen, they have a greater opportunity of inducing very many to comply with them, than they could have, if not only the...
Page 7 - An act for enlarging the time of continuance of parliaments, appointed by an act made in the sixth year of the reign of King William and Queen Mary, intituled, An act for the frequent meeting and calling of parliaments.
Page 7 - An aft for punifhing mutiny and defertion, and for the better payment of the army and their quarters...
Page 23 - ... interpose their advice in treaties and alliances, though I deny it to be their right, this is an argument singly sufficient with me to support the Triennial Bill ; for supposing a ministry shall at any time negotiate an alliance prejudicial to the interest of England, and by their artifice impose upon a parliament to approve and confirm it, is it not a peculiar happiness that such...
Page 8 - An act for better securing certain powers and privileges intended to be granted by his Majesty by two charters for assurance of ships and merchandizes at sea, and for lending money upon bottomry, and for restraining several extravagant and unwarrantable practices therein mentioned...
Page 4 - ... preserve and defend our most excellent constitution, both in church and state, and attempted, by many false suggestions, to render us suspected to our people, we cannot omit, on this occasion, of first summoning our parliament of Great Britain, (in justice to ourselves...
Page 29 - ... of parliaments very deep. No gentleman is ignorant, that the frame of our government is made up of the King, the Lords, and the Commons. These, with respect to each other, have ever been esteemed separate, although, when put together, they make but one entire government. The duration of this form of government in England, longer than in our neighbouring countries, is...
Page 4 - ... made by our loving subjects, with that safety and freedom, which by law they are entitled to, and we are firmly resolved to maintain to them, they will send up to parliament the fittest persons to redress the present disorders, and to provide for the peace and happiness of our kingdoms, and the ease of our people for the future, and therein will have a particular regard to such as showed a firmness to the protestant succession when it was most in danger.

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