The Cambridge Companion to Anselm

Couverture
Brian Davies, Brian Leftow
Cambridge University Press, 2 déc. 2004 - 323 pages
Anselm of Canterbury (1033 1109), Benedictine monk and the second Norman archbishop of Canterbury, is regarded as one of the most important philosophers and theologians of the Middle Ages. The essays in this volume explore all of his major ideas both philosophical and theological, including his teachings on faith and reason, God's existence and nature, logic, freedom, truth, ethics, and key Christian doctrines. There is also discussion of his life, the sources of his thought, and his influence on other thinkers.
 

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Table des matières

Introduction
1
Anselms life works and immediate influence
5
Anselm on faith and reason
32
Anselm Augustine and Platonism
61
Anselms philosophy of language
84
Anselm on modality
111
Anselms perfectbeing theology
132
Anselm and the ontological argument
157
Anselms account of freedom
179
Anselm on truth
204
Anselm on ethics
222
Anselm on the Trinity
257
Anselm on atonement
279
Bibliography
303
Index
313
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À propos de l'auteur (2004)

Brian Davies is Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University, New York. He is the author of An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion (3rd ed., 2003), Thinking About God (1985), The Thought of Thomas Aquinas (1992), and Aquinas (2002). Brian Leftow is Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion at Oxford University. He is the author of Time and Eternity (1991), and over fifty papers in philosophy of religion, metaphysics and the history of medieval philosophy.

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