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GLOBE ATLAS of EUROPE.

Uniform in size with Macmillan's Globe Series, containing Forty-eight coloured Maps, Plans of London and Paris, and a copious Index, strongly bound in half morocco, with flexible back, price 98.

In a few days. NOTICE. This ATLAS includes all the Countries of Europe in a series of Forty-eight Maps, drawn on the same scale, with an Alphabetical Index to the situation of more than 10,000 places; and the reation of the various Maps and Countries to each other is defined in a general Key-Map. The volume is small enough for a traveller's wallet, or for a place on the writing table.

The identity of scale in all the Maps facilitates the comparison of extent and distance, and conveys a just impression of the magnitude of different countries. The size suffices to show the Provincial Divisions, the Railways and Main Roads, the Principal Rivers and Mountain Ranges. As a book it can be opened without the inconvenience which attends the use of a folding Map.

PLANS OF LONDON and PARIS [are added, on scales sufficiently enlarged to designate the streets and public buildings..

New Edition, revised to 1867.

In large crown 8vo, price 16s., cloth, new style, 1100 pp. TOWNSEND'S MANUAL OF DATES.

In this completely NEW EDITION the number of distinct Alphabetical Articles has been increased from 7,383 to 11,045. The whole work remodelled, every date verified, and every subject re-examined from the original authorities.

In comparison with the latest edition of the hitherto considered best work on the subject, "Townsend's Dates now contains nearly double the number of distinct Alphabetical Articles.

THE SEVEN WEEKS' WAR: its Antecedents and its Incidents. By H. M. HOZIER, Military Correspondent of the "Times" with the Prussian Army during the German Campaign of 1866. With numerous Maps and Plans. 2 vols. demy 8vo, cloth, extra gilt, 289.

"Mr. Hozier added to the knowledge of military operations, and of languages, which he had proved himself to possess, a ready and skilful pen, and excellent faculties of observation and description ..... All that Mr. Hozier saw of the great events of the war-and he saw a large share of them he describes in clear and vivid language.”—Saturday Review.

NOTES AND QUERIES, June 22.

"We have on more than one occasion found, in the first edition of the Manual of Dates,' information which we have sought for in vain in other quarters. The new edition will be found more complete, and consequently more useful, even in an increased proportion to its increased size. The Manual of Dates' is clearly destined to take a prominent place among our most useful books of reference."

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Printed by GEORGE ANDREW SPOTTISWOODE, at 5 New Street Square, in the Parish of St. Bride, in the County of Middlesex; and Published by WILLIAM GREIG SMITH, of 43 Wellington Street, Strand, in the said County.-Saturday, July 6, 1867.

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By DOMINICK Mc CAUSLAND, Q.C., LL.D.

RICHARD BENTLEY, New Burlington Street.

BAINES'S LANCASHIRE, A New Edition, in

The Lancashire Lieutenancy," "Ballads and Songs of Lancashire," "Mamecestre," "Collectanea relating to Manchester," &c.

MESSRS. ROUTLEDGE & SONS beg to announce that they have in the Press a Re-issue of this well-known book. It will be printed on excellent paper, forming two handsome demy 4to volumes, price 21. 12s. 6d. A limited impression will be issued, on Large Paper, 2 vols. royal 4to, price 41. 48. On and after the 15th of July next these prices will be advanced to 31. 136. 6d. and 51. 5s., so that immediate orders should be given to the Booksellers.

The chief local facts, statistics, &c., of the principal towns will be brought down to a recent period. It is intended to give the substance of most of the Latin charters and documents in English, and to exclude tertain portions of the work which have now become obsolete, and the best efforts of both Editor and Publishers will be devoted to make the book the most useful and interesting History of the County Palatine that can be produced.

*** It is intended to print a List of Subscribers to the Large-paper Edition (the impression of which will be limited) in each copy of that size, if Names are sent to the Publishers at once.

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS, London and New York.

VISIT of the ARCHEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

HOLDERNESS, with above 200 Engravings, 2 vols. 4to, neat, 218.; large paper, 308.-H. W. BALL, Barton-on-Humber, near Hull, has purchased the small Remainder of the above, and offers on good terms to the Trade.

3RD S. No. 289.

Price Fourpence. Stamped Edition, 5d.

HE QUARTERLY REVIEW, No. CCXLV.,

THE

WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT TUESDAY.

I. NEW PARIS.

CONTENTS:

II. CORNISH ANTIQUITIES. III. MASSIMO D'AZEGLIO.

IV. THE NEW COURTS OF LAW.

V. MOUNTAIN CLIMBING.

VI. CHARACTERISTICS OF ENGLISH HISTORY.
VII. AGRICULTURAL GANGS.

VIII. HANNIBAL'S PASSAGE OF THE ALPS.
IX. THE CHURCH AND HER CURATES.
X. REFORM ESSAYS.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

DEER AND DEER PARKS.

Now Ready, with Illustrations, feap. 4to, 218. OME ACCOUNT OF ENGLISH PARKS, with By EVELYN

SOME

PHILIP SHIRLEY, M.A., F.S.A.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

TINSLEYS' MAGAZINE:

An Illustrated Monthly.
CONDUCTED BY EDMUND YATES.

On the 24th of July will be published, price One Shilling, the first. Number of TINSLEYS' MAGAZINE, an Illustrated Monthly Magazine of Light Literature. Its aim will be essentially amusement, though current topics of general interest will be occasionally treated by competent writers. In the first Number will be commenced, to be continued from month to month, two serial Stories:

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Shortly will be published, in One Volume, demy 8vo, with two Portraits on Steel by William Holl, from Paintings in the possession of Her Majesty the Queen,

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THE PRINCE CONSOR T.

COMPILED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN.

BY LIEUT.-GENERAL THE HON. CHARLES GREY.

London: SMITH, ELDER & CO., 65, Cornhill.

NICHOLLS'S CATALOGUE of ENGRAVED

PORTRAITS, ENGLISH AND FOREIGN, Part IV., just published, can be had gratis and postage free for 1d. stamp. Formerly Assistant to the late Messrs. Evans of I. Great Queen Street and 403, Strand. A. NICHOLLS, Printseller, 5, Green Street, Leicester Square.

The Autographs and MSS. Collections of the late ROBERT COLE, ESQ., F.S.A.

ME

ESSRS. PUTTICK & SIMPSON will SELL by AUCTION, at their House, 47, Leicester Square, W.C. (west side), on MONDAY, July 29, and three following days, the very interesting and valuable COLLECTION of AUTOGRAPHS and MSS. of the late ROBERT COLE, ESQ., F.S.A.: comprising Autograph Letters of Celebrated Persons of various Countries, from an early date to the present time, some of great rarity-Autograph Letters, bound in volumes-highly curious Collection of Letters and Documents connected with Olivia Serres and her claims-Stanhope Family Papers, temp. Henry VIII., Mary, and Elizabeth-very valuable Collection in relation to the Cotton-Spinning Inventions of Lewis Paul-very extensive MS. Collections relating to Devonshire - State Papers and Miscellaneous Documents.

Catalogues will shortly be issued.

R. HOWARD, Surgeon-Dentist, 52, Fleet Street, TEETH, fixed without springs, wires, or ligatures; they so perfectly resemble the natural teeth as not to be distinguished from the original by the closest observer: they will never change colour or decay, and will be found very superior to any teeth ever before used. This method does not require the extraction of roots or any painful operation, and will support and preserve teeth that are loose, and is guaranteed to restore articulation and mastication. Decayed teeth stopped and rendered sound and useful in mastication.-52, Fleet Street. At home from ten till five.-Consultations free.

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Court, W.C. Pictures lined, cleaned, and restored; Watercolour Drawings cleaned, repaired, mounted, and varnish removed; Pastils, Crayons, and Body-Colour Drawings cleaned and repaired; Valuations of Literary and Artistic Property made for Probate or Legacy Duty; also Catalogues of Libraries or Collections of Pictures and Drawings for Private Reference or Public Sale. Works of Art and Virtù purchased and sold on Commission.

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in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, between the Years 1559 and 1597, all of the highest interest and curiosity, presumed to be unique, and hitherto unknown. Reprinted from the celebrated Folio Volume formerly in the Library of the late George Daniel, Esq.; accompanied with an Introduction and Illustrative Notes.

JOSEPH LILLY, 17 and 18, New Street (entrance also 5a, Garrick Street), Covent Garden, London.

The above is beautifully printed by Messrs. Whittingham & Wilkins, on fine toned paper size, post 8vo, consisting of above 300 pages, to range with the Collections of Percy, Ritson, &c.

A Detailed Prospectus and Descriptive Catalogue of the Seventy Ballads, consisting of sixteen pages 8vo, may be had on application, or will be forwarded on the receipt of two postage-stamps.

A Specimen Catalogue of above 50,000 Volumes of Rare, Curious, Useful, and Valuable Books, Splendid Books of Prints, Picture Galleries, Illustrated Works, &c., on Sale, at greatly reduced prices, may also be obtained on application; or in the Country, for two postagestamps.

JOSEPH LILLY, 17 & 18, New Street, and 5A, Garrick Street, Covent Garden, London.

THE celebrated CAMEO of the EMPEROR

the British Museum. A beautiful facsimile of this exquisite gem appears in THE INTELLECTUAL OBSERVER, No. 66, July, 1867. Price 18. 6d. With a description of the Blacas Collection, by Thomas Wright, M.A., F.S.A.

"The Intellectual Observer, Review of Natural History, Microscopic Research, and Recreative Science," is published monthly, price 18. 6d. Illustrated with coloured and tinted plates.

Chemical Aids to Art. By Professor Church. See the new Number of The Intellectual Observer."

The Philosophy of Birds' Nests. By A. R. Wallace, F.Z.S. Various Modes of Propelling Vessels. By Professor M'Gauley. Sun Viewing and Drawing. By the Rev. F. Howlett, M.A., F.R.S. With a tinted plate.

"The Intellectual Observer," No. 66, also contains:

Vegetable Monstrosities and Races.

Mr. Graham's Recent Discoveries. The Absorption and Dialytic Separation of Gases by Colloid Septa. The Occlusion of Gases. Progress of Invention.-Proceedings of Learned Societies. Archæologia. Literary Notices. Notes and Memoranda. "The Intellectual Observer," price is. 6d. monthly.

GROOMBRIDGE & SONS, 5, Paternoster Row, London.

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LONDON, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1867.

CONTENTS.-No 289.

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1623. Sept. The first September my mother Stapleton

died.

1624. Apr. the 23d my sonne John was borne.
1625. Sept. ye 234 my daughter Suzan died.
1626. Mar. ye 5th my father died.
1627. Feb. 7 my daughter Mary borne.

1628. July the 12th my daughter Martha was borne.

Aug. The 11th of August my daughter Mary died.
1630. Feb. ye 15th my sonne Robert was borne.
1631. Aug. ye 7th my daughter Sarah was borne.
1632. Nov. ye 11th my daughter Joane was borne.
Feb. first, Joane died.

1638. Nov. 10th my daughter Sarah died.

1640. Sept. 10th my sonn Robert died at Bowe.

1641. Apr. 12th I Richard Duke tooke this shoppe in my

possession, &c.

1643. Dec. 30th I broke my legg.

1644. Apr. 30th I was marryed to Martha Macro.
1645. Feb. the 27th my daughter Martha was borne att
one of ye clock in ye morninge.

1646. Mar. 30th my daughter Martha dyed and was
buryed in ye Cloister of St Mich. c.

1647. Nov. The 7th my daughter Eliz. was borne. The
22d my deere & loveinge wife dyed & was buryed
in ye chancell by her father.

1648. Novr the 30th I was marryed to Anne Pierce att the
parish of St Barthews ye lesse by Mr How.

1651. May. The first of May being Thursday my daughter
Mary was borne betwixt 2 & 3 of ye clock in the
afternoone.

1653. Apr. 13th my Sonne Edward borne betw. 2 & 3 of .
ye clock in ye afternoone.

1654. Jan. the 12th my daughter Anne was borne neere 2
of ye clocke in ye morninge.

1655. Sept. the 8th my Sonne Edward dyed & was buryed
in ye Cloister of St M: C: the 10th.

1656. Sept. 20th my daughter Sarah was borne betwixt ye
hower of one & two in ye morneinge.

1658. June the 13th MY SONNE RICHARD WAS BORNE BE-

TWEENE THE HOWERS OF ONE & TWO IN YE AFTER-
NOONE.

Aug. the 20th my daughter Elizabeth dyed and was
buryed by her mother in ye chancel of St M. C.

1660. 9 July, sonne Robert borne at 2 clo. morn.

1662. May 3 my daughter Elizabeth borne and baptized

the 13 of May.

1663. Dec. 2. Daughter Eliz. dyed & was buryed the 4th
in the cloister of St M. Cornehill,

1664. Aug. 13. Sonne Peter borne, betwixt 9 & 10 att

night. Baptized the 21st. Mr Jno Sweeting and

Mr Tho. Kelk, godfathers & Mrs Joane Man god-

mother.

1665. Feb. 14. Daughter Susanne borne betwixt
1667. Apr. 5. Daughter Elizabeth borne att my uncle
Whites in Gun Yard in the parish of St Buttolph
Algate London & baptized the 6th of Aprill.
1667. Sept. 18. Sonne Peter dyed & was buryed in the
parish of St Andrew Undershaft on the South Isle
of ye chancell there on the 19th.

of All Hallows, Bread Street: "The xxth daye of De-
cember, 1608, was baptised John, the sonne of John
Mylton, Scrivener."

1668. Jul. 15th my deare and loveing wife Anne Duke departed this life in child bedd imediately after shee was delivered of a sonne dead borne. Duke, it appears, was for some time tutor to the Duke of Richmond, the son of Charles II. by the Duchess of Portsmouth. The poet is known to have enjoyed the friendship and praises of Dryden, Waller, Otway, Lee, Creech, and other contemporary wits of his day, and seems to have been a polite and accomplished scholar, and a respectable, though not a great poet. His poems were printed by Tonson in a volume with those of the Earl of Roscommon in 1717, 8vo.

In 1710 Duke was presented by Dr. Trelawney, Bishop of Winchester, to the wealthy living of Witney, in Oxfordshire, which he enjoyed but for a few months. On Feb. 10, 1710-11, having returned from an entertainment, he retired to bed in apparent health, but the next morning was found a corpse. His death is thus noticed by Dean Swift:

"Dr. Duke died suddenly two or three nights ago; he was one of the wits when we were children, but turned parson, and left it, and never writ farther than a prologue or recommendatory copy of verses. He had a fine living given him by the Bishop of Winchester about three months ago: he got his living suddenly, and he got his dying so too."-Swift's Journal to Stella, Feb. 14, 1711. Again on Feb. 16, he says, " Atterbury and Prior went to bury poor Dr. Duke."

Barnsbury.

POETIC PAINS.

J. YEOWELL.

"There is a pleasure in poetic pains, Which only poets know. The shifts and turns, The expedients and inventions multiform To which the mind resorts, in chase of terms, Though apt, yet coy, and difficult to win," &c. So writes Cowper in "The Task," and its truth will be recognised by every one who has ever made verses. It is, however, not always a "pleasure," and it is often a needless expense of time; and as it is very generally a rime that is given chase to, much labour might, I think, be saved by the use of a riming dictionary. Byron, I believe, always used one; and what may appear strange, my late friend Rossetti, though actually an improvisatore, always had one by him when writing verses. On the other hand, Thomas Hood told me that he had often had to go through the dictionary from end to end in search of a word; and I remember when Crofton Croker and I were writing the second volume of The Irish Fairy Legends, that when I called on him one evening he read to me what he had written of his ballad, "The Lord of Dunkerron," and he stopped at the last stanza without giving the final word, which I supplied at once. "By," said he, slapping the table, "I have been hunting for that very word these last two hours." All this labour might

have been saved by a riming dictionary. There are cases, however, where it is rather a synonym that is wanted. In one of Moore's Irish melodies we meet with

"You may break, you may ruin the vase if you will;" and it is evident that he saw clearly that “ruin" was not the proper term, yet it was not till, I believe, the last edition which he lived to publish that he hit on the more appropriate term "shatter."

Campbell, in his "Hohenlinden," was guilty of what we may perhaps term the puerility of ending every stanza with a trissyllable, as rapidly, scenery, &c., in which the last syllables were to

rime. But the last stanza is

"Few, few shall part where many meet!
The snow shall be their winding-sheet,
And every turf beneath their feet
Shall be a soldier's sepulchre."

Here there is no rime, and as we may learn from his friend Redding, it seems to have been a continual source of trouble to the poet, yet how simple was the remedy! He had only to transpose, and read

"A soldier's sepulchre shall be,"

and there would have been rime, cadence, everything but the aforesaid puerility. It is probable, however, that this may never have occurred either to himself or his friend Redding. Still I am not satisfied with "sepulchre ;" for it does not express the poet's idea, which was that every soldier should lie dead and covered with snow on the spot where he had stood, and it should have been"A soldier's resting-place shall be."

THOS. KEIGHTLEY.

HALS'S "CORNWALL."

Amongst a large collection of works connected with the county, I have The Parochial History of Cornwall, by William Hals, one of the rarest of topographical works. This fragment of his intended history is a portion of the second part, and comprises the account of seventy-two parishes, from Advent to part of Helston inclusive, in 160 folio pages.

It was published by Andrew Brice, a printer at Exeter, in 1750, and contains ten numbers only, when the work dropped from want of encouragement or some other reason. Hals first brought down his history to 1702, but continued it to 1736, and died in 1739, long before the well-known epigram of "Here lies poor Fred." Now, whatever merit may be due to this composition, a reference to Hals will deprive it of the stamp of originality, unless we can assume that the author was really unacquainted with Hals's epigram, and that it is therefore simply a question of singular unanimity of thought between two persons of distant times and places,

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