A View of the Principal Deistical Writers that Have Appeared in England in the Last and Present Century: With Observations Upon Them, Volume 1

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B. Dod, 1755 - 483 pages
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Page 107 - tis supposed, may bear all lights ; and one of those principal lights, or natural mediums, by which things are to be viewed, in order to a thorough recognition, is ridicule itself, or that manner of proof by which we discern whatever is liable to just raillery in any subject.
Page 356 - If any man fin, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jefus Chrift the righteous : and he is the propitiation for our fins, i John, ii, i, 2.
Page 44 - ... to question the truth of what he relates ; viz. that he both made that address to God which he mentions, and that in consequence of this, he was persuaded that he heard the noise he takes notice of, and which he took to come from heaven, and regarded as a mark of God's approbation of the request he had made ; and accordingly, this great man was determined by it to publish his book.
Page 109 - Money ftimulates avarice, does not fatisfy it. The mifer is a friend to none, but a bitter enemy to himfelf. 37 The avaricious man has no friend, becaufe he has no friendfhip for any man. Even his dependents neglect him in ficknefs or in adverfity, when he has not power to hurt them.
Page 61 - He aflerts, that by the law of nature every man hath a right to all things, and over all perfons, and that the natural condition of man is a ftate of war, a war of all men againft all men : that there is no way fo reafonable for any man as to anticipate, that is, by force and wiles to...
Page 466 - ... his whole conduct a dignity becoming his divine character. Many of his miracles were of such a kind, and performed in such a manner, as seemed to argue a dominion over nature, and its established laws, and they were acts of great goodness as well as power. He went about doing good to the bodies and to the souls...
Page 7 - Accordingly he exprefsly declares in the above mentioned treatife, that it was far from his intention to do harm to the beft religion, as he there calls Chriftianity, or the true faith, but rather to eftablifh both...
Page 60 - God, prayer, thankfgivings, oblations,1 &c. yet he advanceth principles which evidently tend to fubvert all religion. The account he gives of it is this, that " from the fear of ." power invifible, feigned by the mind, or " imagined from tales publicly allowed, ari" feth religion, not allowed, fuperftition.
Page 356 - Chrift the righteous : and he is the propitiation for our fins : And not for ours only, but alfo for the fins of the whole world, i John 3.
Page 44 - The serious air with which he relates it, and the solemn protestation he makes, as in the presence of the eternal God, will not suffer us to question the truth of what he relates ; viz. that he both made that address to God which he mentions, and that in consequence of this, he was persuaded that he heard the noise he takes notice of, and which he took to come from heaven, and regarded as a mark of God's approbation of the request he had made; and accordingly, this great man was determined by it...

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