The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, Volume 2

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Little, Brown, 1853
 

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Page 106 - The Court agree to give Four Hundred Pounds towards a School or College, whereof Two Hundred Pounds shall be paid the next year, and Two Hundred Pounds when the work is finished, and the next Court to appoint where and what building.
Page 352 - English &c. of our charter and of our oaths of allegiance, whereas our allegiance binds us not to the laws of England any longer than while we live in England, for the laws of the parliament of England reach no further, nor do the king's writs under the great seal go any further; what the orders of state may, belongs not in us to determine.
Page 428 - ... the best part is always the least, and of that best part the wiser part is always the lesser.
Page 127 - Commissioners, or at least six of them, as in the sixth article is provided : and that no charge be required of any of the Confederates, in case of a defensive war, till the said Commissioners have met, and approved the justice of the war, and have agreed upon the sum of money to be levied, which sum is then to be paid by the several Confederates in proportion according to the fourth article.
Page 264 - It was then generally agreed upon, that our brother Philemon Purmont shall be instructed to become schoolmaster for the teaching and nurturing of children with us.
Page 400 - Davenport, besides many other friends, with many fears as well as prayers and tears they set sail. Mr. Davenport in prayer with an observable emphasis used these words: Lord, if it be thy pleasure to bury these our friends in the bottom of the sea, they are thine ; save them!
Page 402 - Now therefore why tempt ye God, to put a yoke upon the neck of the disciples, which neither our fathers nor we were able to bear?
Page 103 - The sudden fall of land and cattle, and the scarcity of foreign commodities, and money, etc., with the thin access of people from England, put many into an unsettled frame of spirit, so as they concluded there would be no subsisting here, and accordingly they began to hasten away...
Page 280 - The covenant between you and us is the oath you have taken of us, which is to this purpose, that we shall govern you and judge your causes by the rules of God's laws and our own, according to our best skill.
Page 193 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!

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