Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 1

Couverture
E. Duyckinck, 1827
0 Avis
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

Quantity of interest in real property
74
And then in Kent
75
Construction of statute
80
Duties of lord and vassal
81
Must be taken most strongly against
85
The system universal atnongst barbarous Burgage tenure what
88
218
89
The feodal polity roade part of the consti Gavelkind
100
Of the origin of parliaments
102
Of the constituent parts of parliament
108
332
112
AND REVERSION
116
of
126
59
128
besides certain other less material variations there are two principal points
133
266
134
Adopted by Norman barons and after
138
The laws of parliament
142
Rule peculiar to our own laws
149
From this system maxim is derived that Villenage pure or privileged
157
Every grant and conveyance of a fee simple
161
60
162
The privileges of parliament
164
Contingent or executory remainders what 169
169
61
171
Potentia propinqun or the persons being
177
Law defined to be a prescribed rule of
179
Law of nature
188
The laws and customs of house of lords
195
Grants
201
If freehold they must be limited on free Descent by common
202
Estates tail forfeited for treason
209
Therefore trustees to preserve contingent Lineal which subsists between father son
218
By divorce a vinculo matrimonii
227
Ancient method of attestation
229
Restraining statute
235
By divorce a mensâ et thoro
240
Declaratory
249
Or reason
263
Antiquity and origin
269
in particular
273
Gaolers and gaols
276
The nature doctrine and principal laws
279
Doctrine of uses
280
The sense agreeable to law must be pre
310
Summary
317
Concluding observations
321
Curates
327
395
333
Executory devise what
348
Qualifications of electors
358
Qualifications of elected
368
70
371
NERAL
375
OF THE CIVIL STATE
397
Descendible
422
END OF BOOK II
426

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 365 - The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Page 18 - Commentaries remarks, that this law of Nature being coeval with mankind, and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid, derive all their force, and all their validity, and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Page 308 - By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband...
Page 140 - ... and for default of such issue to the Princess Anne of Denmark and the heirs of her body and for default of such issue to the heirs of the body of the said Prince of Orange.
Page 388 - Franchise and liberty are used as synonymous terms, and their definition is a royal privilege or branch of the king's prerogative, subsisting in the hands of a subject.
Page 107 - ... there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate; yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, there remains still 'in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative', when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them...
Page 106 - It hath sovereign and uncontrollable authority in the making, confirming, enlarging, restraining, abrogating, repealing, reviving, and expounding of laws, concerning matters of all possible denominations, ecclesiastical or temporal, civil, military, maritime, or criminal: this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is entrusted by the constitution of these kingdoms.
Page 360 - There is nothing which so generally strikes the imagination, and engages the affections of mankind, as the right of property; or that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in total exclusion of the right of any other individual in the universe.
Page 279 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.

Informations bibliographiques