The Lounger's Common-place Book, Volume 1

Couverture
editor, and sold, 1796
 

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 216 - ... to dive into the depths of dungeons ; to plunge into the infection of hospitals ; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain ; to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt; to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.
Page 197 - Here lies our good Edmund, whose genius was such, We scarcely can praise it, or blame it too much ; Who, born for the universe, narrow'd his mind, And to party gave up what was meant for mankind.
Page 197 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit : Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit ; For a patriot too cool ; for a drudge disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir — To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor.
Page 198 - As an actor, confess'd without rival to shine; As a wit, if not first, in the very first line : Yet, with talents like these, and an excellent heart, The man had his failings, a dupe to his art.
Page 143 - After some common discourses had passed between us, he called for a manuscript of his ; which being brought he delivered to me, bidding me take it home with me, and read it at my leisure ; and when I had so done, return it to him with my judgment thereupon. When I came home, and had set myself to read it, I found it was that excellent poem which he entitled
Page 47 - I am fully convinced you had a companion on Sunday : I interpret it as owing to the weakness of human nature ; but such proceeding is far from being ingenuous, and may produce bad effects, whilst it is impossible to answer the end proposed. You will see me again soon, as it were by accident, and may easily find where I go to ; in consequence of which...
Page 188 - Yet hope not life from grief or danger free, Nor think the doom of man revers'd for thee...
Page 45 - I never had the honour to live among the great, the tenor of my proposals will not be very courtly ; but let that be an argument to enforce a belief of what I am now going to write.
Page 65 - you ought to keep a coach." Pozz. " Yes, sir, I ought." Bozz. " But you do not, and that has often surprised me.
Page 38 - I am punished, is both unreasonable in itself, and particularly severe with regard to me, who have always lived an inoffensive Life in the Neighbourhood where I was born, and defy my Enemies (if I have any) to say I ever wrong'd Man, Woman, or Child.

Informations bibliographiques