The Jewish Marriage Contract: A Study in the Status of the Woman in Jewish Law

Couverture
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2004 - 316 pages
0 Avis
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
Epstein, Louis M. The Jewish Marriage Contract: A Study in the Status of the Woman in Jewish Law. New York: Jewish Theological Seminary, 1927. xvii, 316 pp. Reprint available December, 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. 1-58477-464-9. Cloth. $85. * A cogent and compelling examination of the history and significance of the Jewish marriage contract, the Ketubah, with extensive notes in Hebrew and English. As Epstein notes in the preface, the Ketubah offers an excellent introduction to the character of Jewish marriage because it is not a sentimental, rhetorical or subjective text. Instead, it is "a legal document embodying the essential points agreed upon by the parties and sanctioned by the law as to the manner of their living together as husband and wife" [2]. This work will interest those concerned with property rights, family, divorce, and the evolution of betrothal and marriage.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

The Ketubah and Its Function
1
The Antiquity of the Ketubah
17
Formalities and Construction
32
The Marriage and the Mohar Clauses
53
Mattan
78
Dowry
89
Mulug
107
Succession
121
Fines and Forfeitures
207
Fines and Forfeitures Continued
224
The Lien
236
Payment
255
Special Clauses
269
The Changing Conception and Status of the Betrothed
285
Register of Published Ketubot and Allied Deeds
297
BIBLIOGRAPHY
301

Bed and Board
144
Sundry Obligations
162
Provision for the Widow and Orphaned Daughters
175
Provisions as to Divorce
193
SOURCES AND AUTHORITIES
305
CRITICAL NOTES
307
INDEX
311
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 1 - ... expression In the laws enacted. Hence the citation of decisions from another state is of no helpful value unless it can be said that its legal policy is In harmony with our own. In England in former times, and in most of the states, as well as our own, the doctrine is recognized that there are always three parties to a marriage contract,— the husband, the wife, and the state.
Page 11 - If the wife of a man be taken in lying with another man, they shall bind them and throw them into the water. If the husband of the woman would save his wife, or if the king would save his male servant (he may ) . §130.

Informations bibliographiques